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Eva Maria Steinschaden-Vavtar,

Lecturer in Instrumental Educational Theory - Violin

  • Mirabellplatz 1/III (Room: A03007)
  • 5020 Salzburg

Eva Steinschaden received her first violin tuition at the age of four from her father, Bruno Steinschaden. Later she studied under Helmut Zehetmair and Ruggiero Ricci at the Mozarteum University Salzburg, gaining her teacher's diploma in 1988 and her performer's diploma in 1989, before spending some years studying with Maestro Renato Zanettovich at the Scuola Superiore di Musica da Camera del Trio di Trieste in Duino/Italy. She attended master classes with various teachers, including Shmuel Ashkenazy, Ljerko Spiller, Thomas Brandis and Enrico Bronzi, and won first prize in many competitions, such as Jugend Musiziert. For many years she led the Leopold Mozart Chamber Orchestra in Salzburg, she was a member of various chamber ensembles, including the Steinschaden Trio Salzburg and a regular extra with the Salzburg Mozarteum Orchestra.

For more than ten years she has concentrated primarily on chamber music and the Duo :nota bene:, founded together with pianist Alexander Vavtar in 1996. In 2012 she founded the Piano Trio 3:0, together with cellist Detlef Mielke and pianist Alexander Vavtar. She has travelled to every continent, giving over 500 concerts, and has made numerous recordings for radio, television and on CD. Solo performances include concertos with distinguished orchestras such as the Sinfonia Varsovia, Poznan Philharmonic, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra/Bulgaria and Leopold Mozart Chamber Orchestra Salzburg.

Eva Steinschaden has taught violin at the Salzburg Musikum since 1988 and has held a teaching post for violin at the Mozarteum University Salzburg  since 1992. For many years she was a teacher at the annual chamber music master classes in Schloss Zell an der Pram/Austria, and has held master classes at universities and schools of music in Malta, Mexico, Canada, India, Philippines, Indonesia and China. Eva Steinschaden plays a violin from Pierre Silvestre from 1840.